A Jewish Parent Versus Child Relationships


Judaism commands us to respect our mothers and fathers.
As with other human relationships, Jewish parents and their children (both adult and minor) are, in traditional Judaism, bound to each other by a series of commanded responsibilities and sacred practices. Most societies emphasize reverence for parents; post-biblical Judaism appears to have gone further than its contemporaries in mandating that parents provide for their children with very specific preparations for the future. Furthermore, Judaism sees parents and offspring as bound to each other not only for practical or humanistic reasons, but also as a way of honoring God.

Parenting in the Torah

The Torah includes numerous mitzvot regarding parent-child interaction. Fathers must circumcise sons on their eighth day of life (Genesis 17:10-14). Parents may not sacrifice their children, neither to a foreign deity (Leviticus 20:1) nor to God. Incest is strictly forbidden (Leviticus 18:6-7). Parents are responsible for educating their children (Deuteronomy 11:19). First-born sons must be redeemed from the priesthood (Exodus 13:2,13). Insults to parents are subject to grave punishment (Leviticus 20:9).

Honoring parents (kibbud av va’em) is among the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:12, Deuteronomy 5:16); the requirement to show them reverence appears in Leviticus (19:1-3). The language of these two commandments provides motivations for their observance. The wording in Exodus (nearly identical in Deuteronomy) states that one who honors parents will lengthen one’s life and continue one’s link to the land of Israel: “Honor your father and your mother so that your days will be lengthened on the land Adonai your God gave to you.” The motivation here is one of a promised reward.

In Leviticus, we find that reverence is part of participating in God’s holy plan: “And Adonai spoke to Moses, saying: ‘Speak to all the community of the Children of Israel, and say to them — ‘You shall be holy, for I, the Lord your God, am holy. A man shall revere his mother and his father and observe my Sabbaths; I am Adonai your God.’ ”

These laws generated much discussion among the rabbis of the Mishnah and Talmud. Much of their wisdom is found in the Talmud ic tractate Kiddushin, surrounding the following teaching:

All the mitzvot of the son [incumbent] upon the father–men are obligated and women are exempt. And all the mitzvot of the father [incumbent] upon the son–both men and women are obligated. (Mishnah Kiddushin 1:7, Babylonian Talmud Kiddushin 29a)

The ensuing discussion (continuing in the Talmud until 32a) contains definitions of these two categories, explanations of their gender distinctions (e.g.mothers cannot be obligated to do for sons mitzvot that they are not commanded to do themselves), biblical derivations, stories and role-models regarding performance of the commandments. Fathers are obligated to circumcise, redeem, teach Torah to, acquire a wife for, and teach a craft to sons.

Both sons and daughters must honor mothers and fathers by providing them with food and drink, clothing and covering them, and providing for their mobility. Children show reverence by not standing or sitting in a parent’s place, contradicting his/her words, or opposing a parent in a dispute.

Spiritual Aspects of Parenthood

Along with these practical concerns, we also are provided a deeply spiritual understanding of the bond between child and parent. After connecting biblical verses pertaining to honor of parents and honor of God, the Talmudic sages offer the following statement: “There are three partners in a person–the Holy One of Blessing, one’s father, and one’s mother. The Holy One of Blessing said [to the ones who honor their parents], ‘I rest over them as if I dwelled among them and they honored me.’ ” Parents are seen as partners in God’s creation of each human being; therefore, to honor one’s parents is to honor God. Similarly, to display disregard, disrespect, or violence toward one’s parents is to do so to God.

The place of parent as God’s representative is further emphasized through the mitzvah to teach one’s children Torah — God’s word. Adoptive, step- and foster parents are included in this sacred relationship — “He who brings up a child is to be called its father, not he who gave birth” (Shemot Rabbah 46:5 and elsewhere) — although the mutual legal obligations are not, strictly speaking, identical. Parents offering the traditional Friday night blessing to their children do so as God’s emissaries.

Incredible Bible Verses Match Hebrew Years in Astonishing Prophetic Countdown

“For the Lord GOD will do nothing but He revealeth His counsel unto His servants the prophets.” Amos 3:7 (The Israel Bible™)

A numeric method of matching Bible verses to Hebrew years has led a prominent rabbi in Jerusalem to the discovery that there is a direct correlation between the two which could pinpoint the deadline for the messiah.

Rabbi Ephraim Sprecher, Dean of Students at the Diaspora Yeshiva and a noted lecturer, recently revealed an amazing method of prophecy that can be accessed by simply reading the Bible. Rabbi Sprecher stated that according to Kabbalah, Jewish esoteric learning, every year has a corresponding verse in the Torah. According to Rabbi Sprecher, all that is required to find the verse that describes a particular year, whether it is in the past or the future, is to count verses from the beginning of Genesis until the number of verses equals the Hebrew calendar year.

Rabbi Sprecher explained that this is one of the reasons scribes who write Torah scrolls are called ‘Soferim’, which literally means ‘counters’. Handwriting the sacred scrolls, Torah scribes count the letters and the spaces. With remarkable precision, Rabbi Sprecher noted that there are 304,805 letters in the Torah, 79,847 words, and 5,845 verses. He believes that the year correlating to the final verse in the Bible will signal the End-of-Days, quite literally.

“What that means is that the Moshiach (messiah) must come by the year 5845, since that is the year we run out of verses,” he explained. “All we have to do is hang on for another 68 years.”

The rabbi gave an incredible example of how this system works. World War II began in 1939, which was the Hebrew year 5699. The corresponding 5,699th verse in the Torah is disturbingly appropriate.

And that the whole land thereof is brimstone, and salt, and a burning, that it is not sown, nor beareth, nor any grass groweth therein…Deuteronomy 29:22

Rabbi Sprecher warned that the verses do not always reveal the entire truth. He explained that six years later, after World War II ended in 1945, people tried to understand the horrors they had just experienced. The war-torn world searched for the reasons behind the war and the Holocaust.

The secret things belong unto Hashem our God; but the things that are revealed belong unto us and to our children for ever, that we may do all the words of this law. Deuteronomy 29:28

“The Holocaust was too great, too enormous, for man to understand and ascribe a reason,” the rabbi explained.

The rabbi jumped ahead to 1948, the year Israel became a state. The Hebrew year was 5708 and the verse is fitting indeed.

That then Hashem thy God will turn thy captivity, and have compassion upon thee, and will return and gather thee from all the peoples, whither Hashem thy God hath scattered thee. Deuteronomy 30:3

In 1950, Israel was inundated with massive immigration. Over 150,000 Jews made aliyah (immigrated to Israel) in 24 months, the most intensive period ever of Jews returning to their homeland. The verse clearly reflects this.

And Hashem thy God will bring thee into the land which thy fathers possessed, and thou shalt possess it; and He will do thee good, and multiply thee above thy fathers.Deuteronomy 30:5

Another powerful example is the verse that correlates to 1968, the year after Israel’s miraculous victory in the Six Day War. The verse corresponding to the year 5727 describes the aftereffects of the Six Day War in 1967, the reality Israel was presented that year.

Hashem thy God, He will go over before thee; He will destroy these nations from before thee, and thou shalt dispossess them Deuteronomy 31:3

The verse describing to this year, 5777, is ominous indeed, written in language that does not bode well.

For a fire is kindled in My nostril, and burneth unto the depths of the nether-world, and devoureth the earth with her produce, and setteth ablaze the foundations of the mountains. Deuteronomy 32:22

This may describe the moment, in April, when for the first time the US military dropped its largest non-nuclear explosive device on Islamic State (ISIS) troops entrenched in tunnels dug into a mountain in Afghanistan. The Massive Ordnance Air Blast bomb (MOAB), nicknamed the Mother-of-All-Bombs, succeeded in “setting ablaze the foundation of the mountain”, killing all ISIS personnel.

Skeptics of Rabbi Sprecher’s method of understanding the Bible, need only wait a little more time. Whether or not the technique is accurate will become clear on September 30, 2084, when the verses run out.

The Paul Of Tarsus: A False Teacher Or True Apostle?


Rembrandt’s painting of Apostle Paul

Rembrandt’s “Apostle Paul” courtesy of the National Gallery of Art

Yahushua knew that when He returned to Heaven, Satan would seek to destroy the fledgling Christian Ekklesia. By ridicule, by force, by deceitfulness, Satan indeed tried to destroy what Yahushua had raised up.

To meet the emergency, Yahuwah “gave some apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers; for the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of . . . Yahushua. (See Ephesians 4:11, 12.)

The goal of this great gift was so “we [could] all come in the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of . . . [Yah], unto a perfect man. . . that we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the sleight of men, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive.” (Ephesians 4:13, 14)
One wind of doctrine that has been growing in strength is the belief that Paul was a false apostle, brought in by the devil to destroy the new Christian faith. Paul’s warning in Acts is applied to him, as an imposter and apostate:

“For I know this, that after my departing shall grievous wolves enter in among you, not sparing the flock.” (Acts 20:29, NKJV)

Various phrases, once in a while a full text, from Paul’s writings are taken out of context and used to support the contention that he was a false apostle, brought in by the devil to wreak havoc on the “flock” of believers.

These phrases, taken primarily from First and Second Corinthians accuse Paul of:

Boasting;

Stealing;

Pride;

Graft;

Cursing;

Speaking NOT on behalf of YHVH;

Using trickery and deceit;

Passing judgment upon others;

Belittling Peter, James and John;

Consulting with Satan;

Holding an exalted opinion of himself;

Injecting his own ideas into Scripture;

Preaching “another” gospel;

Giving faulty marriage counsel;

Telling husbands to start living the single life again;

Dictating “proper” hairstyles for men;

Judging hungry, growling stomachs.

These scattered texts and partial phrases are taken out of context and used as “proof” that Paul himself was one of the ravening wolves he warned against. Taking verses out of context should always raise warning flags in every mind.

Such claims do not regard the context of the surrounding verses; they do not consider the environment in which Paul was raised nor the culture for which he was writing. 

The style of Paul’s writing is consistent with the literary style of the first century A.D. He used a “point-and-counter-point” style of reasoning that was commonly used by the Israelite scholars of his day.

Rejecting the writings of Paul typically does not end with cutting his epistles from the Bible, which account for 14 of the 27 books of the New Testament. Consistency demands that if Paul is a false apostle whose books should be removed from the Bible, then the two books written by his co-laborer, Luke, must also be rejected because Luke clearly supports Paul as an apostle commissioned for Gospel work by Yahushua.

But it does not stop there. If Paul were a deceiver whose writings must be rejected, then the authority of the other apostles is also called into question because the leading apostles, Peter, James and John, accepted Paul’s apostleship:

“. . . when James, Cephas [Peter], and John, who seemed to be pillars, perceived the grace that had been given to me, they gave me and Barnabas the right hand of fellowship, that we should go to the Gentiles and they to the circumcised.” (Galatians 2:9)

The James who extended the “right hand of fellowship” to Paul, was not James, the brother of John, for he had already been martyred by that point. This James was the highly respected step-brother of Yahushua and author of the New Testament book of James. 

If Paul were a false teacher, then the trustworthiness of those who extended to him the right hand of fellowship, must also be questioned. The result is that eight more books of the remaining 11 books of the New Testament must be laid aside. These are:

The Gospel of John

First Peter

Second Peter

James

First John

Second John

Third John

The Revelation

The only books remaining in the New Testament then would be Matthew, Mark and Jude. Nor are these unassailable. 

The gospels of Matthew and Mark support Peter and John as men commissioned by Yahuwah. But if Peter and John are untrustworthy for accepting Paul as one of them, then the judgment of Matthew and Mark is questionable for accepting Peter and John. The only book left in the New Testament is the single-chapter book of Jude.


list of books that must be dismissed if one rejects the inspiration of Paul 

The real danger in setting aside the writings of Paul, however, is found in the motivation prompting such charges against this most prolific of the New Testament writers.

The whole Hebrew economy revealed the plan of salvation in type and symbol. This was why, when Yahushua wanted to explain His mission the evening after His resurrection, “beginning at Moses and all the Prophets, He expounded to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning Himself.” (Luke 24:27)

Paul was raised and educated as a Pharisee. He was a member of the Sanhedrin. Israelite tradition demanded that any prospective member of the Sanhedrin have the Torah, the five books of Moses, entirely memorized by age 12.

Paul’s education as a Pharisee made him very well-acquainted with the Law as well as what part was merely the traditions of men. This made him an extremely capable teacher of the gospel, rightly dividing between Truth and Tradition.

Paul’s denouncement of the rite of circumcision has led some to reject his writings as a Law-breaker. Nothing could be further from the truth. Paul upheld the divine Law as “holy and the commandment holy and just and good.” (Romans 7:12)

Circumcision is one of the statutes. Paul did not argue against circumcision as a statute. He simply clarified that it would not somehow earn one salvation.

The entire thrust of Paul’s ministry was righteousness by faith. Clearly understanding that salvation is by grace alone, through faith, Paul’s writings must be understood in the context of his struggle against the heresy of salvation by works.

All false religions are based on salvation by works, in one form or another. Even the Israelite religion had degenerated into a system of salvation by works under the traditions of the elders which Yahushua repeatedly rebuked.

Righteousness by Faith (Galatians 5:5)Gentile believers, coming out of paganism, were easily lured back into the salvation by works taught by “Judaizers.” The Judaizers claimed to believe in Yahushua as the Messiah, but their influence was to return to the traditions of men as the means to salvation. 

They rejected salvation as a free gift received when one chooses to believe in the Saviour.

Paul’s clarion call to the Gentile believers echoes down to truth-seekers today:

“For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of . . . [Yahuwah]: not of works, lest any man should boast.” (Ephesians 2:8, 9, KJV)

Adopting the traditions of the Jews does not bring one salvation. Wearing tassels and head coverings does not recommend one to Yahuwah. Using Hebrew words that no one else can understand does not make one a better Law-keeper.

Salvation by works is very alluring to fallen human nature. Adopting Jewish traditions, clothing or words can easily make one feel superior to those who do not adopt the same traditions.

Whether the life-style choices are founded on Scripture or are merely Jewish tradition, the point is that salvation by works may feed the ego but will never earn anyone salvation. 

Law-keepers will be careful in diet and dress. But to use it as a standard by which to judge one’s merits, destroys the very essence of the Law which is Love.

The Pharisees rigorously kept the do’s and don’ts of the Law, but neglected love, kindness, justice and mercy. Yahushua told them:

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you pay tithe of mint and anise and cumin, and have neglected the weightier matters of the law: justice and mercy and faith. These you ought to have done, without leaving the others undone.” (Matthew 23:23)

Salvation by works will never save anyone.

“But that no one is justified by the law in the sight of . . . [Yahweh] is evident, for ‘the just shall live by faith.’ ” (Galatians 3:11)

Satan knows no one will ever be saved by works. He has led people to misunderstand Paul’s writings and reject the clearest teachings in Scripture of the vital doctrine: righteousness by faith.

Here is the real secret behind the rejection of Paul. Paul’s clear understanding of the Law versus Tradition led him to reject the law as the means of earning one’s salvation. 

Paul taught that the Law should be kept. However, he understood it can only be kept by faith in Yahuwah. 

The only hope anyone has is to cease trying to work one’s way to Heaven. Accept that all the “works of the law” you have performed cannot save you. 

“All our righteousnesses are like filthy rags.” (Isaiah 64:6)

Righteousness by faith means Yahushua lives out His life in you. Your will is brought into perfect harmony to Him. Then and only then is the divine Law perfectly kept.

Paul, an apostle divinely commissioned by Heaven to take the gospel to the Gentiles, has a message for all today who would be saved:

I am crucified with . . . Yahushua: nevertheless I live; yet not “I,” but Yahushua lives in me: and the life which “I” now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the son of Yah who loved me, and gave Himself for me. (See Galatians 2:20)

Do not be swayed by the varying winds of doctrine. Be rooted and grounded in Scripture. 

Accept the righteousness of Yahushua by faith. You, too, can experience the joys of salvation through faith in the merits of the Saviour. 

The Jewish Priests Ready For Biblical Status Confirmed By DNA And Prepared for Third Temple

“But the Kohanim the Leviim the sons of Tzadok that kept the charge of My sanctuary when the children of Yisrael went astray from Me they shall come near to Me to minister unto Me; and they shall stand before Me to offer unto Me the fat and the blood saith the Lord GOD.” Ezekiel 44:15 (The Israel Bible™)

The priests (Kohanim) gather in the Holy Temple with the High Priest (screenshot)

In a powerful blend of science and religion, a rabbi has turned to genetics to reinstate the priesthood for the Third Temple. This rabbi believes that science has proven that the priesthood is exactly as the Bible described: An eternal covenant that will reappear to herald in the Third Temple.

“Genetics connects modern Judaism to the Bible, confirming 3,000 years of Jewish tradition,” explained Rabbi Yaakov Kleiman to Breaking Israel News. “This is an amazing testament to God’s covenant and the Jewish People. Despite more than 2,000 years of exile we have maintained our religion, our customs, our Torah, and our genetic identity.”

Manifesting prophecy is Rabbi Kleiman’s daily work. He opened the Center for Kohanim in Jerusalem nine years ago as a practical endeavor, and has authored a book on DNA evidence of the priesthood. Kohanim, or priests, are Jewish men believed to be descendants of Aaron, the first high priest of Israel. The Temple service may only be performed by kohanim.

In his effort to designate priestly candidates, Rabbi Kleiman has turned to genetics as an aid. This tools first became available 20 years ago when genetic researchers in Haifa discovered a Y chromosome, a genetic marker passed from father to son, that indicated a common ancestry for Jewish men whose family traditions hold that they are descended from the Biblical priestly class.

Rabbi Kleiman is using this science for a purpose the researchers probably had not envisioned: to help prepare for the Third Temple.

“According to prophecy, there will be a Third Temple, and when there is, we will need to identify the priests,” Rabbi Kleiman explained to Breaking Israel News. “Kohanim are the manpower of the Temple. Without them, it is an empty building.”

But the Kohanim the Leviim the sons of Tzadok that kept the charge of My sanctuary when the children of Yisrael went astray from Me they shall come near to Me to minister unto Me; and they shall stand before Me to offer unto Me the fat and the blood saith the Lord GOD. Ezekiel 44:15

As a kohen himself, Rabbi Kleiman has a personal interest in the work. He is essentially tracing his own family tree back 106 generations. For him and other kohanim, the results have prophetic implications.

The rabbi noted that this genetic phenomenon represents scientific proof of the most long-lasting unbroken tradition known to modern man. He attributes this to the eternal aspect of the priestly covenant described in the Bible.

“This scientific proof is an affirmation that, as the Torah said, the priestly covenant would be eternal,” the rabbi said, citing the Book of Numbers.

And it shall be unto him, and to his seed after him, the covenant of an everlasting priesthood. Numbers 25:13

Priests are a subset of the Tribe of Levi, but this genetic tool has proven ineffective in identifying the Levites, who also have a role in the Temple.

“Levi is the same concept and you would expect the same genetic markers but there is not the same percentage of the J group, the genetic marker showing that Jews originated in the Middle East. This indicated that the tradition of being a Levi is not as strong as that of kohanim,” Rabbi Kleiman explained.


Kohanim perform the priestly blessing on Sukkot. (Flash90)

He speculated that the rituals and the stringencies connected with being a kohen strengthened the tradition. Kohanim are forbidden from marrying converts or divorcees. Also, the public nature and honor associated with giving the priestly blessing in synagogue make identifying kohanim a significant part of the Jewish community.

Similarly, genetics has been unable to find markers for the individual tribes of Israel.

Though “Jews have genetic markers that show that they are from the Middle East,” Rabbi Kleiman explained, “There were many different nations living in the region. Even if we can show a common ancestry with Abraham, he had two sons. We can show a common ancestry but are unable to find markers for specific tribal haplotypes (genes passed from father to son).”

The rabbi noted that genetics will not have the final word. According to Jewish tradition, Elijah the prophet will appear before the Messiah to clarify precisely this issue: who is a priest and who is not, and the tribe to which each Jew belongs.

Behold I will send you Elijah the prophet before the coming of the great and terrible day of Hashem. And he shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children and the heart of the children to their fathers; lest I come and smite the land with utter destruction. Malachi 3:23

Nonetheless, the rabbi does not feel that this final clarification will render his work futile. He hopes that when Elijah arrives, the genetically verified kohanim will already be hard at work in the Third Temple.

“When Elijah arrives, If he wants the DNA information, we will be happy to give it to him,” Rabbi Kleiman joked. “But he will probably be making his determinations based on a higher source.”

The Top Trump Advisors Practicing Weekly White House Prayer Meetings


“When the righteous are increased, the people rejoice; but when the wicked beareth rule, the people sigh.” Proverbs 29:2 (The Israel Bible™)

Since the beginning of the White House transition in January, members of President Donald Trump’s cabinet have been gathering for weekly prayer sessions led by Capitol Ministries Pastor Ralph Drollinger. Though religion has always been part of the White House, these sessions include an impressive number of the highest-ranking members of the Trump Administration.

Capitol Ministries provides Bible studies, evangelism and discipleship to political leaders in over 40 US state capitols. The ministry also hosts separate weekly Bible studies in the House and Senate.

“In terms of a country’s health and direction, when its leaders are seeking God, the nation is in a position to be blessed by God,” Drollinger told CBN News.

Though not personally observant, Trump was blessed several times by pastors and rabbis during his presidential campaign. He has yet to attend the weekly prayer sessions but last month, he held a group moment prayer after he announced the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch for the Supreme Court.

As an outside group, the Capitol Ministry sessions, which are closed, must be sponsored by someone in the government in order to hold meetings in a Congressional building. In the White House, they are currently sponsored by no less than eight politicians: Vice President Mike Pence; Secretaries Betsy DeVos, Ben Carson, Sonny Perdue, Rick Perry, Tom Price and Jeff Sessions; EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt and CIA Director Mike Pompeo. Former US Rep. Michelle Bachmann (Rep-Minnesota) serves on the board.

The Prophet Elijah Visited Mystic Rabbi To Pray and Repend Right Now

“Behold I will send you Elijah the prophet before the coming of the great and terrible day of Hashem.” Malachi 3:23 (The Israel Bible™)

(Photo: אדם אליוא)

Last Saturday night, a mystic rabbi fell into a trance and received a divine vision that warned of heavenly gates closing, bringing about a period of global suffering. The vision revealed that one gate has been forced open temporarily by Elijah the prophet, but the key to keeping that gate open is in the hands of people.

On Saturday evening, Rabbi Amram Vaknin, a renowned mystical rabbi from Ashdod, arrived at his sister’s house in Ashdod to perform the Havdallah service ending the Sabbath. In the middle of saying the blessings, he fell down in a deep trance. He lay for approximately 20 minutes, occasionally groaning and mumbling. In the middle of his trance, he spoke, giving a clear message for all of Israel.

“Aaah, Jerusalem,” the rabbi groaned. “Pray for Jerusalem.They need to pray because of the painful decrees. How the city is suffering today!”

The rabbi lay in silence for several minutes, groaning occasionally and uttering a few sentences. After about ten minutes, he began to speak..

“The victory is important.They will win,” the rabbi finally said. “They don’t want to pray, even though I asked them several times. What can I say to those who think they are so great?”

At this point, the rabbi had a vision he was conversing with Elijah the prophet. Rabbi Vaknin, who has had several powerful visions of Elijah, frequently prays at the prophet’s cave in Haifa. The prophet appears to him as a spiritual guide in his visions.

Many of the predictions have come true. In October 2015, Rabbi Vaknin had a chilling vision that much Jewish blood was going to be spilled in Israel. Tragically, the vision proved to be accurate. The wave of violence that began just a few weeks before that vision continued with increasing intensity until the summer. In that time, there were almost one thousand stabbing, shooting, and vehicular attacks that injured over 650 Israelis and killed 47.

“Hello, Eliyahu (Elijah) the Prophet,” Rabbi Vaknin continued while in the trance. “Please, Elijah, open one of the five gates for them in Heaven. Just in case they want to do teshuva (atone) and pray, and stop with the lies and the falseness, so that one gate will be open for them. And if they don’t repent, then that gate will also close.”

After another long pause, the rabbi received an answer.

“Elijah the prophet opened one good gate. But what will be in Jerusalem will be good and bad,” he said. “They don’t want to pray! They don’t want to stop the lies and evil. I don’t understand. Elijah opened one gate of the five, one gate for good, but where is that good gate?”
Rabbi Vaknin later explained his vision to Gil Nachman, his personal assistant.

“Elijah the Prophet came to give him this message because a difficult time is coming to Jerusalem,” Nachman told Breaking Israel News. “There are five gates that can be used to access heaven’s mercy, but only one is open. Elijah opened that final gate for the sake of Israel. There is about to be a difficult time with much blood being spilled, and two great rabbis are going to die. ”

The rabbi’s vision might be connected to the five actual gates that entered the First and Second Temple.
“At one point in his vision, Rabbi Vaknin asked Elijah, ‘If it is a good gate that you have opened, then why are so many going to die?’” The rabbi receive a message which explained this seeming contradiction. “He was told that from our perspective it is bad, but from Heaven, it looks good because in the end, there will be a great victory and Eliyahu HaNavi (the prophet) will clearly arrive.

“The gate is open, but whether or not we go through the gate is up to us. He was told that everyone needs to pray and repent right now,” Nachman concluded. “Elijah said ‘from great to small’ needs to pray.”

Shabbat’s Work Prohibition Traditional do’s and don’ts for the Jewish day of rest


Note: Jews observe Shabbat in a variety of ways. The following explains the most traditional and strict interpretations of what is and is not permitted on Shabbat.

Reprinted with permission from The JPS Guide to Jewish Traditions, published by the Jewish Publication Society.

The Bible does not specifically list those labors that are prohibited on the Sabbath, although it alludes to field labor (Exod. 34:21; Num.15:32-36), treading in a winepress and loading animals (Neh. 13:15-18), doing business and carrying (Isa. 58:13; Jer. 17:22; Amos 8:5), traveling (Exod. 16:29-30), and kindling fire (Exod. 35:2-3) as forbidden work.

Beyond Torah: What Can and Can’t We Do?

In the Mishnah, the Rabbis enumerated 39 major categories (with hundreds of subcategories) of labor that were forbidden (avot melakhah) based on the types of work that were related to the construction of the Tabernacle in the wilderness, which ceased on the Sabbath (Shab. 7:2).

work on shabbat

Activities that cannot be performed on the Sabbath are basic tasks connected with preparing the showbread (sowing, plowing, reaping, binding, threshing, winnowing, selecting, grinding, sifting, kneading, baking), work related to making the coverings in the Tabernacle and the vestments used by the Kohanim (shearing sheep), bleaching, carding (changing tangled or compressed material into separate fibers), dyeing, spinning, stretching (material), making two loops (meshes), threading needles, weaving, separating, tying (a knot), untying (a knot), sewing, tearing, activities concerned with writing and the preparation of parchment from animal skin (trapping or hunting), slaughtering, flaying (skinning), treating skins (curing hides), scraping pelts, marking out (to make ready for cutting), cutting (to shape), writing, erasing, construction (building, demolishing), kindling a flame (lighting, extinguishing), carrying (from private to public domain, and vice versa), and putting the finishing touches to a piece of work already begun before the Sabbath.

The Rabbis decreed that one not only should avoid forbidden acts but also must not do anything that (1) resembles a prohibited act or could be confused with it, (2) is a habit linked with a prohibited act, or (3) usually leads to performing a prohibited act.

The rabbinic enactment of measures to prevent these possibilities was termed “putting a fence around the Torah” (Avot 1:1). For example, ripping up a piece of paper was forbidden since it resembles “cutting to shape” or could be confused with it.

Similarly, agreeing to buy something was prohibited, because most agreements are confirmed in “writing”; climbing a tree is forbidden, because it may lead to breaking twigs or tearing leaves, which could be construed as “reaping” (i.e., separating part of a growing plant from its source). Other activities that by extension are prohibited on the Sabbath include the following:

*Adding fresh water to a vase of cut flowers (sowing–any activity that causes or furthers plant growth).

*Making a bouquet of flowers (making a sheaf).

*Separating good fruit from spoiled fruit (winnowing, selecting, sifting).

*Brushing dried mud from boots or clothes (grinding).

*Cutting hair or nails (shearing sheep-removing outer covering of a human or animal).

*Applying makeup (dyeing).

*Braiding hair (weaving).

*Drawing blood for a blood test (slaughtering).

*Rubbing soap to make lather, applying face cream, polishing shoes, using scouring powder for utensils or other surfaces (scraping-smoothing the surface of any material by grinding, rubbing, or polishing).

*Sharpening a pencil (cutting to shape-altering the size or shape of an item to make it better for human use).

*Painting, drawing, typing (writing, making durable marks on a durable material).

*Tearing through lettering on a package (erasing).

*Opening an umbrella or unfolding a screen (building).

*Smoking a cigarette, using the telephone (kindling a fire).

(Switching off an electric light (extinguishing a fire).

*Setting or winding a clock or watch (finishing off).

*Wearing eyeglasses not permanently required (carrying from private to public domain and vice versa).

Then What Can We Do?

For an activity to be considered as work forbidden on the Sabbath, the violation must be intentional. Therefore moving a chair from one place to another is permissible, even though it may produce an impression on the ground. Similarly, walking on the grass is allowed, even though this may result in some of it being crushed underfoot and thus technically constitute the prohibited activity mentioned above or the forbidden cutting of blades of grass.

One has not violated the Sabbath as long as the original purpose was solely to move the chair or to walk on the grass. In contrast, one is not permitted to engage in a task that always results in forbidden work. Thus washing oneself on a lawn is prohibited because it inevitably will result in watering the grass, which is forbidden on the Sabbath.

You Can’t Even Touch Some Things

Any items that may not be used on the Sabbath may not even be handled on that day, lest one unintentionally perform one of the forbidden types of work. These objects are termed muktzeh, meaning to “set aside” or “store away.” Among the many things considered muktzeh are money and checks; scissors, hammers, and saws; pencils and pens; battery-operated toys and flashlights; radios and CDs; telephones and computers; and certain religious objects such as shofar, tefillin, and lulav. Even the Sabbath candlesticks are muktzeh and thus should not be touched on the Sabbath after the candles have been lit.

Even if not strictly classified as forbidden work, certain “mundane matters” should be avoided on the Sabbath. These include weekday chores (such as packing suitcases and rearranging furniture, which are not in keeping with enjoyment of the restful spirit of the Sabbath), opening mail, and discussing business issues or matters of everyday concern. One is forbidden to even think about or make plans for the week ahead, such as preparing equipment, mapping out a route, readying a briefcase for the next day, or setting the table for a party on Saturday night.

Based on Isaiah’s exhortation that one “honor it (the Sabbath) by not doing your usual ways” (Isa. 58:13), the Rabbis recommended that a person should even walk differently on the Sabbath, avoiding the long strides and rushing about that characterize the pace of most people on weekdays.

The Rules on Fire!

In addition to the general forbidding of all manner of work on the Sabbath, there is a special prohibition against making a fire (Exod. 35:3). The Rabbis considered this to include everything that pertains to the kindling of light, even if no actual work is involved. In modern times, there is a controversy regarding whether the switching on of electric lights and appliances is equivalent to making a fire.

There are two reasons to think that switching on an electric light may not be considered kindling. First, switching on a light does not create electric power; the power exists already. Second, there is no combustion in the filament of an electric light. Nevertheless, Orthodox Jews do not use electric appliances on the Sabbath, believing that the prohibition against kindling a fire was not based on the physical effort involved in rubbing two stones together to produce a spark but rather on the thought and planning that resulted in its generation.

For the Hazon Ish, the activation of an electric current and its transmission to sources of power, heat, and light that is produced by turning on a switch is forbidden because it falls under the category of “building” — intentionally causing something to happen. An exception is the refrigerator, which may be opened and closed because any electric current that this produces is incidental and without conscious intent. However, many observant Jews unscrew the refrigerator bulb for the Sabbath.

Lights that have been kindled before the Sabbath, such as the Sabbath candles, are allowed, as are an oven for keeping previously cooked food warm and a burner to keep water warm for coffee or tea. Similarly, it is permitted to leave an electric appliance running during the Sabbath and to use a timer to automatically turn an appliance on or off, as long as the timer is set before the Sabbath begins.

One mechanism to ease the difficulty of complying with the prohibition against work on the Sabbath was the concept of the Shabbos goy–a non-Jew hired by an observant family to perform certain activities forbidden to Jews on the Sabbath, such as starting a fire and turning lights on and off. However, the proliferation of electronic timers has virtually eliminated the need for the Shabbos goy.

Originally published by www.myjewishlearning.com